Top 10 Reasons to Own Organic Coconut Farmland (And We Show You How)

Here are ten compelling reasons to own the mighty, versatile, and massively popular coconut. And at the end, we show you the perfect way to own this amazing cashflow-producing asset.

We can drink its water, eat its meat, and bang two empty halves of its shell together to make horse hoof sounds.

Hailed as a “superfood,” the mighty coconut is associated with hundreds of potential applications and benefits (though of its many uses, clip-clop horsey sound effects simulation is definitely the coolest). Coconuts generate a diverse variety of products, including milk, cream, toothpaste, beauty solutions, charcoal, and—of course—the massively popular, pro athlete and celebrity-endorsed, four-dollars-a-bottle coconut water. Soon, there could be a new use for coconuts: biofuel to run diesel engines.

As longtime fans of the versatile coconut palm, we wanted to share ten reasons why you should consider owning organic coconut farmland: 

High demand...

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How the 2020 US Election Will Impact the Multifamily Market

I’m not sure if you already knew this, but there is an election coming up. And it’s kind of a big deal. 

Whether you talk to historians, economists, political scientists, medical health professionals, climate change experts, or your local dogcatcher, the general consensus is that the stakes of the U.S. presidential election between President Donald Trump and former Vice President Joe Biden have risen to unprecedented historical standards.  The outcome is likely to reverberate across all three branches of the U.S. government and—considering the central place the U.S. holds in the global financial system—the entire world. 

But the fate of American democracy and the future of the free world aside, what does this fulcrum election mean for multifamily real estate investments? 

During previous elections, we’ve seen investors become a little jumpy. Election years create instability in the stock market, and that uncertainty has a way of...

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Here’s Why Farmland Is Always The Smart Investment

Long before the COVID-19 crisis swept the globe, we urged our friends, family and Alliance members to invest in farmland. 

Sure, when we first published our article on the top five reasons to invest in farmland back in early January 2020, we couldn’t have imagined the economic upheaval the looming global pandemic would cause. 

After all, it was before China’s decision to shut down cities with millions of people. It was before WHO declared the coronavirus outbreak a pandemic. It was before our societies were brought to a standstill and our rates of unemployment soared. 

What we did know, even back then, is that pandemic or not, farmland is and likely always will be a safe and reliable asset class. It was true during those rosy pre-pandemic days of (comparative) economic stability, and it’s true now that the global economy has taken a nosedive. 

But hey, we’re not here to say, “We told you so” (even though we did)....

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Farmland Investing: Permanent versus Row Crops

Chocolate or vanilla?

Gryffindor or Slytherin? 

Row crops or permanent crops? 

These are some of life’s quintessential conundrums. But while the first two questions have straightforward answers (chocolate and Gryffindor, clearly), choosing between investing in row or permanent crops isn’t so straightforward. 

Before I break down the answer to this classic investor stumper, let me lay the foundation:

In the exciting, lucrative world of agricultural investing, there are essentially two different categories of assets: Row crops and permanent crops. Let’s talk a little bit about each one: 

Row crops

Our Pineapple Farm Investment in Panama

These are crops that are planted on a seasonal or yearly basis—think wheat, barley, cotton, and corn in the U.S. or our amazing pineapples in Panama. The name “row crops” comes from the way these crops are laid in condensed, machine-planted rows. 

The best thing about investing in...

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Many Reasons to Think Twice Before You Buy Gold

August 15th, 2020 from Denver, Colorado.

I woke up today, Saturday, at 5am and decided I needed to dump out my thoughts on Gold.

Because I’m tired of reading the same old bullshit articles from the mainstream media.

These banal articles are designed to consume your time.

They don’t really tell you anything of value to help you invest or manage your finances.

So before you rush out and buy gold because Warren Buffet just did

Or because the gold spot price soared past $2,000 for the first time ever, hitting a new record-high on August 6th

Let’s just hit pause and educate ourselves for a second. 

Breathe. Pause. Count to ten please. Relax.

I would argue that Gold’s recent price run-up has been caused by the global pandemic.

Which has put the world into an overnight recession. Heading towards an eventual global depression.

Followed by a long-term “K” shaped economic recovery. (Some things go up and others stay down)

High...

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Are we at risk of Stagflation or even, shock horror, Hyperinflation?

Healthy, growing economies will always experience slight fluctuations in inflation.

Inflation, as we discussed in a previous post, is an economic condition where there is a sustained rise in the prices of products and services (or, in some cases, the sustained fall in the value of currency). 

But while controlled inflation is a product of economic growth, inflation can be treacherous when taken to extremes.

In this post, we’ll discuss two dangerous types of inflation: stagflation and hyperinflation.

Stagflation 

Stagflation occurs when there is a sustained period of high inflation combined with high unemployment and no economic growth. A seemingly contradictory condition, stagflation is characterized by a simultaneous rise in prices and a decline in economic output. Stagflation rarely occurs in a normal market economy, as a slow economy typically reduces consumer demand, driving prices down.

If you look at the components of Stagflation below, it doesn't seem like...

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Is the U.S. Headed Towards a Post-Pandemic Deflationary Disaster?

In this series of posts, our goal is to explain economic concepts so you can better understand the risks to your assets, whether you hold them in cash, stocks, mutual funds, real estate, or gold.

In a previous post, we discussed how the trillions of dollars in new money being injected into the U.S. economy by the Federal Reserve have sparked fears of an inflationary disaster. But while inflation could become a problem in the not-so-distant future, economic history suggests there is a more pressing—and perhaps more dangerous—concern: Deflation.

In simple terms, deflation is a drop in the prices—as opposed to inflation, where prices rise. The economic phenomenon can be caused by an increase in goods and services, a decrease in the supply of money and credit, or—as is the case during this pandemic—a decrease in demand.  

If falling prices sound like an attractive scenario, think again. While a moderate drop in prices can promote consumption...

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Monetary Inflation: What Is It, and Do I Need to Protect Myself?

In a scramble to keep the economy from plummeting into a depression during the COVID-19 crisis, the US Government signed off an unprecedented $2.3 trillion in relief to support households, employers, financial markets, and state and local governments. And discussions continue on providing a second stimulus package worth an additional $1 trillion.

For the most part, this money is coming essentially out of thin air.

But conventional wisdom has held that governments cannot simply create money on such a massive scale and continue propping up the markets without triggering inflation.

Should investors be worried? To understand whether inflation is likely to become a risk in the near term, let’s take a closer look at what inflation is, what causes it, and how you can protect yourself. 

Inflation: An Overview

In 1990, the average cost of a new home in the U.S. was $79,100, and the average income was $17,710. Only 29 years later, the median price for a new home is $329,750,...

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Covid-19 Investor Update Part 4: Boutique Hotel in Puerto Rico and a Colombian Coffee Farm

We previously published Part 1 of our Covid-19 Investor Update, focusing on our Pineapple Farm in Panama.  In Part 2, we looked at multiple Agricultural investments in Colombia. Part 3 focused on a few of our Multifamily investments in the United States.

This is the final Part 4 update on a boutique hotel investment in Puerto Rico and our Coffee Farm in Colombia. So let’s jump straight in.

Plaza Colon Hotel and Suites, Old San Juan, Puerto Rico

In Q2 2019, alongside many of our Alliance members, we invested in a boutique hotel opportunity in Plaza Colon. This Opportunity Zone syndication project consisted of taking a 40,188 square foot property and converting it into a high-end hospitality offering comprising 60 hotel rooms and 4 luxury 2&3 bedroom Hotel Residences. With the additional development of a 3,500 square foot commercial space on the ground floor that will feature a restaurant and retail space to capitalize on foot traffic from the cruise ships docking just...

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The Stock Market Is Broken! Here's What You Should Do To Prepare.

In my last post, I wanted to ensure people understood the Monetary and Fiscal policy tools that can be used to help us out of the Covid-19 recession (or probable depression).

Today, I want to turn my educational post to the definition of what it means to be in either a recession or a depression:

Recession: a period of temporary economic decline during which trade and industrial activity are reduced, generally identified by a fall in GDP in two successive quarters.

Depression: an extended recession that has years, not quarters, of economic contraction.

For context, there have been 33 recessions since 1854. But the more relevant period to look at are the 11 recessions since 1945, the end of the Second World War. The average contraction period for those 11 recessions was 11 months from peak to trough. And it took, on average, just under 5 years for the expansion phase to play out post-recession.

For additional context, there has only ever been one depression, The Great Depression of...

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